estate

Some pre administration points to consider

On a death what needs to be done, who does it and in what order?

The death needs to be registered, normally within five days, with the Registrar of Births, Marriages and Deaths. Check online at www.gov.uk for the nearest office. If the death was at home, in hospital or in a residential or nursing home you have authority to register the death if you are a relative, someone who was present at the death, someone representing the “occupier” of the building where the death occurred or an official from the hospital or someone who has taken responsibility for arranging the funeral. If the death was not at home you only have authority if you are a relative, someone who was present at the death or have taken responsibility for arranging the funeral.

The Registrar will need the medical certificate (green form) issued by the doctor, the full name of the deceased, where applicable the maiden surname, any previously used names, occupation, last address, name and occupation of any predeceasing spouse/civil partner, or name, occupation and date of birth of any surviving spouse/civil partner and information about any state benefits. The Registrar is then in a position to issue a certified copy death certificate and a green form for burial or cremation that needs to be handed to the funeral director who will guide you through the process for the funeral.

If there is a Will it should be checked to ascertain if there are funeral instructions included or with it.

Some matters that should also be considered at this time are:

  • Insurance of the house/contents
  • Removal of items of value to a safe place
  • Cancellation of any milk/newspaper deliveries
  • Securing all windows and doors
  • Activation of any house alarm